Eyes of the Earth                                             1996 & 1997

 

        The oldest of sciences is astronomy, born from our fascination with looking at the night sky and trying to understand the seasonal repeated motions of the sun, moon, planets and stars.  Bone carvings as old as 30,000 years seem to be notations of the moon’s waxing and waning.  Stonehenge in the UK, Cuiquilco in Mexico, the Woodhenge at Cahokia, Missouri and the numerous medicine wheels across North America are Man’s physical records of the movements in the heavens and his attempt to give understanding to what was happening above.

Eye of the Earth 1 thru 5    1997

Acrylic on Masonite

29” x 20”

Eye of Cuiquilco    1997

Acrylic on Masonite

49” x 36”

Large Array    1997

Acrylic on Masonite

49” x 36”

Persistence of Form    1997

Acrylic on Masonite

49” x 36”

Phases 3    1996

Acrylic on Canvas

30” x 22”

Phases 4      1996

Acrylic on Canvas

30” x 22”

Phases 5     1996

Acrylic on Canvas

30” x 22”

There are many examples of stone circles made by indigenous cultures to record the observed movements of the stars and planets.   The actual heavenly events are given a physical representation from which a virtual explanation can be derived.  This may be a precursor to both myth and scientific practice.

    In 1974, Artist, Nancy Holt presented a work at New York’s Artpark called ‘Hydra’s Head’.  It referenced native myths that called reflective puddles on the ground ‘Eyes of the Earth’.

  All of our astronomical creations, including visual and radio telescopes, as well as our own eyes can be imagined as the Eyes of the Earth.